Joel E. Dembling

Joel E. Dembling.-Age 66, of Newton, lost his battle with cancer on Sunday, August 16, 2020. Beloved husband of Jane (Fishman) Dembling. Devoted father of Andrew and Sarah. Dear brother of Paul Dembling, Leslie Esteghamati and Julie Cyker. Cherished son of the late David and Adele Dembling. Loving brother-in-law to Nancy Dembling, Michael Esteghamati, Howard Cyker, Gary Fishman and Agi Fishman, Stu and Peg Fishman, Ken Fishman and Wayne Lapinski, and Anne and Jonathan Rand. Beloved uncle and cousin. Infinitely approachable, a treasured friend to so many. Private graveside service at Adath Jeshurun Cemetery, 350 Grove St., West Roxbury, MA. Remembrances may be made to CARING FOR A CURE and mailed to: Mass General Hospital Development Office, Attn: Caring For A Cure, 125 Nashua Street, Boston MA 02114.

 


Ann Gehr

Gehr, Ann (Shapiro), of Needham, MA passed away August 13, 2020. Beloved wife of the late Bernard N. Gehr. Devoted mother of Dr. Gerald Gehr and his wife Eloise, and Nancy Goldstein and her husband Steven. Proud grandmother of Aaron (Alison) Goldstein and Jonathan (Stephanie) Goldstein. Adoring great-grandmother of Jordyn, Leah, Levi and Zeke Goldstein. Loving sister of Mollie Rotman and the late Dorothy Shuster. Private graveside services were held. In lieu of flowers, donations in Ann’s memory may be made to Rosie’s Place, 889 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118, Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward St., Newton, MA 02459, or the charity of your choice.


Lillian A. Singer

Of Auburndale, formerly of Boca Raton, FL., and New York, on August 7th, 2020. Beloved wife of the late Paul Singer. Devoted mother of Carol Singer Bricklin and her husband Daniel Bricklin of Newton and Gary Singer and his wife Susan Olshansky Singer of New Canaan, CT. Loving sister of the late Rosalind Blankenheimer. Dear grandmother of Rachel Bricklin and her husband Matthew Duane, Adina Bricklin and her husband Alexander Keift, Jessica Singer and Hannah Singer. Great Grandmother (Gigi) to Nora and Bryce Duane and Theia.  The funeral was a private ceremony on Zoom held on Sunday afternoon, August 9th and the internment was held at the Polonnoe Cemetery, 776 Baker Street West Roxbury, MA.  Remembrances may be made to the Friends of Tanglewood, Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 or Susan G. Komen, 13770 Noel Road, Suite 81889, Dallas, TX 75380. www.brezniakfd.com.

 

 

 

 

 


Ruth (Luxenberg) Lubot

Of Spring House, Jamaica Plain on August 12, 2020. Beloved wife of the late Howard Lubot. Devoted mother of Tama Bello and her husband Stanley of Ipswich, Helene DiCarlo and her husband Henry of Abington and the late Dr. Eric Lubot and his surviving wife Gail Lubot. Dear grandmother of Marc and Cindy Bello, Charles Bello and Robert Pinnix, Neil and Patricia Bello, Mardie and Craig Bays and Matthew and Laura DiCarlo, Rebecca Lubot and Steven Lubot. Great grandmother of 12.  In lieu of flowers remembrances may be made to a charity of your choice.


veteran Sumner M. Redstone

Sumner M. Redstone-of Beverly Hills, CA, formerly of Boston, on August 11, 2020.Private graveside service was held August 12, 2020 at Sharon Memorial Park, Sharon, MA. He was the son of the late Michael and Belle (Ostrovsky) Redstone. He leaves his daughter Shari, son Brent,  5 grandchildren and  5 great-grandchildren. He was the brother of the late Edward Redstone. Donations in his memory may be made  to the COVID-19 Response Fund at The Boston Foundation, www.tbf.org/Sumner Redstone.


Ellen B. (Blotner) Lipson

Lipson, Ellen B., 86 yrs, of Dedham, August 10, 2020. Daughter of the late Harry Blotner and Sylvia (Lewitt) Blotner. Beloved husband of Dr. Charles Lipson of 64 years. Devoted mother of Robert and Felicia, Peter and Hap, David and Abigail, and the late Caroline Kaufer. Proud grandmother of Harry, Celia, Isaac and Aaron, Sophie and Greg, Jenny, Tom, Hillary and Catherine. Loving sister of the late Kenneth Blotner.

Ellen’s work, in between raising five children, included helping to design this country’s early warning system (the DEW line) and helping to design the nation’s prototype air defense system, the Cape Cod System, and then the SAGE systems, as well as other projects. In retirement she was an elected member and the treasurer of her Democratic ward committee in Newton. She has also served as a volunteer greeter at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

Ellen spent a lifetime of living, working studying and making a difference in the Boston area. Ellen served as president of the Newton League of voters and then spent a number of years volunteering for the state league as a lobbyist. As well as working for the Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston. Ellen earned her B.A. in mathematics at Wellesley College and her M.A. in applied math at Harvard.

Ellen’s career began in her early twenties at Lincoln Laboratories in Lexington, MA where she worked on developing equations describing the interception of bombers by fighter interceptors. This was the beginning of the air defense system. Interrupted when the children arrived, Ellen picked up her work again as they went off to high-school and college. She took advantage of a National Science Foundation offer to update women in science at Northeastern University. That opportunity gave her three quarters of free tuition and a chance to learn computer programming in time to be able to help the Air Force apply systems engineering to its radar programs.

When she went back to work she went to Mitre Corporation, an offshoot of Lincoln Laboratories that had taken over the system engineering programs of Lincoln Laboratories. Although much of what she did is still so secret that she would not talk in any detail about it, but she does admit to working on the radar installed in Berlin, the DEW line, and one of the early over the horizon radars. She also was sent to a still secret location in Europe leaving Charlie with a blind Phone number in case of emergency. She also went to Keflavik, Iceland for a month for Air Force work. In retirement, she tracked the stock market from her computer, something she did for more than just amusement as a day trader.

Funeral service and burial will be private. A driveway shiva will be held at the home of Stephen Kaufer and Lisa Howe on Wednesday & Thursday from 1-3 pm. Donations in Ellen’s memory can be made to Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, 148 Chestnut St., Needham, MA 02492.


Dr. Noel R. Rose

Noel R. Rose, whose experiments in the 1950s helped launch the study of autoimmune diseases and whose decades of research and teaching led colleagues to call him the “father of autoimmunity,” died July 30 at a hospital in Boston. He was 92.

He died after a stroke, said his son David Rose.

Dr. Rose began his investigations when the idea of autoimmune disease — that the body’s immune system can produce illnesses by attacking its own cells — was considered preposterous. Today, largely because of Dr. Rose’s early groundwork in the field, more than 80 autoimmune diseases have been identified, including Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, affecting more than 20 million Americans, a disproportionate percentage of whom are women.

“Add them up and the number of people with these diseases is very high,” Dr. Rose told The Washington Post in 1995. “Autoimmune diseases are one of the big three, meaning cancer, heart disease and autoimmune disease.”

Beginning in 1951, Dr. Rose became a medical researcher and instructor at what was then the University of Buffalo, working in a laboratory led by immunologist Ernest Witebsky, who had fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Witebsky, who studied the properties of different blood types, was interested in how antigens entered the body and triggered an immune response from naturally produced antibodies. It was how the body healed itself: Harmful viruses and other invasive organisms were identified and vanquished by the immune system.

Witebsky’s academic mentor in Germany had been a student of Paul Ehrlich, a Nobel laureate who died in 1915. Ehrlich made major discoveries in immunology and, at the turn of the 20th century, coined a term that became well known in the field: horror autotoxicus, or the dread of self-poisoning. It represented the notion that the body could not destroy itself.

Witebsky suggested that Dr. Rose study thyroglobulin, a protein found in the thyroid gland. Dr. Rose extracted the protein from various mammals, including humans, horses and pigs, treated it with a substance to induce an immune response, then injected it in laboratory rabbits. The rabbits produced antibodies to fight off the foreign protein, even though it was structurally similar to the rabbits’ own thyroglobulin. Next, Dr. Rose used thyroglobulin obtained from other rabbits and came up with the same results — the experimental rabbits produced an immune response to ward off thyroiditis, or inflammation of the thyroid gland.

To his surprise, he discovered that the rabbits produced antibodies to fight off the invading antigen, even though it was derived from their own bodies.

“Is it actually possible that an animal can respond to its own antigen?” Dr. Rose told the Johns Hopkins University Gazette in 2014, recalling his sense of wonder at the time.

Because the experiment upset the commonly held ideas propounded by Ehrlich and others, Witebsky ordered Dr. Rose to repeat it again and again. Every time, the results were the same.

“We finally realized that we had essentially induced an autoimmune disease experimentally,” Dr. Rose told the Gazette. “That changed the world.”

“At first, the immunologic world was suspicious of this whole business,” Dr. Rose said in a 2019 interview with Brigham Clinical & Research News. “To take one of the basic dogmas of immunology — horror autotoxicus — and turn it on its head, well . . . but eventually people bought into it.”

Meanwhile, Dr. Rose and Witebsky began to compare their results with blood samples from human patients with Hashimoto’s disease — a form of thyroid inflammation that had, at the time, no known cause. They found that the human patients had developed antibodies that resembled those found in the experimental rabbits injected with their own thyroglobulin.
“In every aspect,” George Tsokos, a Harvard Medical School professor, said in the June issue of the publication the Scientist, Dr. Rose “is the father of autoimmunity. The man opened a whole chapter in the book of medicine.”

Noel Richard Rose was born Dec. 3, 1927, in Stamford, Conn. His mother was a teacher, his father a physician who served in the medical corps during World War II. He later developed a specialty in treating patients with rheumatic fever, now considered an autoimmune disease.

“I became enraptured with the idea that there is another world around us that we don’t see,” Dr. Rose told the Scientist earlier this year. “It was something that raised my curiosity from the beginning and has been the theme of most of my career.”

Despite holding part-time jobs, Dr. Rose completed his bachelor’s degree in zoology at Yale University in three years, graduating in 1948. At the University of Pennsylvania, he received a master’s degree in 1949 and a doctorate in 1951, both in microbiology.

While working in the laboratory and teaching courses, Dr. Rose graduated from medical school in 1964 from what is now called the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York system.

After joining Johns Hopkins University in 1982, Dr. Rose chaired the department of immunology and infectious diseases at the School of Public Health. He became the founding director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Autoimmune Disease Research, which he founded in 1999.During those years, his research focused on environmental causes of autoimmune diseases, with a particular emphasis on myocarditis, or heart inflammation.

“When I began, autoimmune disease was a field that was nonexistent,” he said in 2014. “People thought it was a crazy idea. As we, and others, began to publish more articles, the world began to change. Autoimmune diseases started popping up all over the place.”

He was a consultant to the World Health Organization, chaired the Autoimmune Diseases Coordinating Committee at the National Institutes of Health and was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

He spoke at scientific symposiums and on radio shows, taking calls from patients with autoimmune diseases, about 75 percent of whom are women.

“One of the problems with patients having autoimmune disease is that they have a natural tendency to go from doctor to doctor to doctor, because their disease is often complex,” Dr. Rose said on NPR in 2002. “It doesn’t fit neatly in a clinical specialty. So I think it’s much better to have one internist, one family doctor with whom you feel comfortable and then let him or her try to sort out what kinds of underlying problems you may have.”

Noel R. Rose, whose experiments in the 1950s helped launch the study of autoimmune diseases and whose decades of research and teaching led colleagues to call him the “father of autoimmunity,” died July 30 at a hospital in Boston. He was 92.

He died after a stroke, said his son David Rose.

Dr. Rose began his investigations when the idea of autoimmune disease — that the body’s immune system can produce illnesses by attacking its own cells — was considered preposterous. Today, largely because of Dr. Rose’s early groundwork in the field, more than 80 autoimmune diseases have been identified, including Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, affecting more than 20 million Americans, a disproportionate percentage of whom are women.

“Add them up and the number of people with these diseases is very high,” Dr. Rose told The Washington Post in 1995. “Autoimmune diseases are one of the big three, meaning cancer, heart disease and autoimmune disease.”Beginning in 1951, Dr. Rose became a medical researcher and instructor at what was then the University of Buffalo, working in a laboratory led by immunologist Ernest Witebsky, who had fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Witebsky, who studied the properties of different blood types, was interested in how antigens entered the body and triggered an immune response from naturally produced antibodies. It was how the body healed itself: Harmful viruses and other invasive organisms were identified and vanquished by the immune system.

Witebsky’s academic mentor in Germany had been a student of Paul Ehrlich, a Nobel laureate who died in 1915. Ehrlich made major discoveries in immunology and, at the turn of the 20th century, coined a term that became well known in the field: horror autotoxicus, or the dread of self-poisoning. It represented the notion that the body could not destroy itself.

Decades later in Witebksy’s laboratory in Buffalo, Dr. Rose became a third-generation scientific descendant of Ehrich, and the first to challenge his prevailing idea, which had hardened into doctrine.

Witebsky suggested that Dr. Rose study thyroglobulin, a protein found in the thyroid gland. Dr. Rose extracted the protein from various mammals, including humans, horses and pigs, treated it with a substance to induce an immune response, then injected it in laboratory rabbits. The rabbits produced antibodies to fight off the foreign protein, even though it was structurally similar to the rabbits’ own thyroglobulin.

Next, Dr. Rose used thyroglobulin obtained from other rabbits and came up with the same results — the experimental rabbits produced an immune response to ward off thyroiditis, or inflammation of the thyroid gland.

To his surprise, he discovered that the rabbits produced antibodies to fight off the invading antigen, even though it was derived from their own bodies.

“Is it actually possible that an animal can respond to its own antigen?” Dr. Rose told the Johns Hopkins University Gazette in 2014, recalling his sense of wonder at the time.

Because the experiment upset the commonly held ideas propounded by Ehrlich and others, Witebsky ordered Dr. Rose to repeat it again and again. Every time, the results were the same.

“We finally realized that we had essentially induced an autoimmune disease experimentally,” Dr. Rose told the Gazette. “That changed the world.”

“At first, the immunologic world was suspicious of this whole business,” Dr. Rose said in a 2019 interview with Brigham Clinical & Research News. “To take one of the basic dogmas of immunology — horror autotoxicus — and turn it on its head, well . . . but eventually people bought into it.”

They stated their findings about Hashimoto’s disease in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1957, years before their paper about the original experiments that led to the breakthrough was published. Since then, the range of autoimmune diseases has grown to include Graves’ disease (or hyperthyroidism), scleroderma, lupus, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriatic arthritis.
“In every aspect,” George Tsokos, a Harvard Medical School professor, said in the June issue of the publication the Scientist, Dr. Rose “is the father of autoimmunity. The man opened a whole chapter in the book of medicine.”

Noel Richard Rose was born Dec. 3, 1927, in Stamford, Conn. His mother was a teacher, his father a physician who served in the medical corps during World War II. He later developed a specialty in treating patients with rheumatic fever, now considered an autoimmune disease.

Aside from his father, Dr. Rose was strongly influenced by a seventh-grade teacher who brought his microscope to the classroom.  Despite holding part-time jobs, Dr. Rose completed his bachelor’s degree in zoology at Yale University in three years, graduating in 1948. At the University of Pennsylvania, he received a master’s degree in 1949 and a doctorate in 1951, both in microbiology.

While working in the laboratory and teaching courses, Dr. Rose graduated from medical school in 1964 from what is now called the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York system.

Dr. Rose published almost 900 scientific papers and helped write or edit more than 20 books, including a textbook, “The Autoimmune Diseases,” which has had multiple editions.

He was a consultant to the World Health Organization, chaired the Autoimmune Diseases Coordinating Committee at the National Institutes of Health and was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

He spoke at scientific symposiums and on radio shows, taking calls from patients with autoimmune diseases, about 75 percent of whom are women.

“One of the problems with patients having autoimmune disease is that they have a natural tendency to go from doctor to doctor to doctor, because their disease is often complex,” Dr. Rose said on NPR in 2002. “It doesn’t fit neatly in a clinical specialty. So I think it’s much better to have one internist, one family doctor with whom you feel comfortable and then let him or her try to sort out what kinds of underlying problems you may have.”

In 2015, Dr. Rose retired from Johns Hopkins and moved to Massachusetts, where he had a joint appointment to lecture at Harvard Medical School and work in the pathology department of Brigham and Women’s Hospital until his death.

Survivors include his wife of 69 years, Deborah Harber Rose of Brookline, Mass; four children, Alison Rose Weinstock of Weston, Mass.; David Rose of Waterloo, Ontario, Bethany Rose Kramer of Framingham, Mass.; and Jonathan Rose of Romeo, Mich.; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Dr. Rose was considered an engaging teacher. Throughout his career, he helped evaluate medical school curriculums and worked with other academic departments to improve the classroom skills of scientists and other professors.


Jessica Cohn

Jessica Cohn

Of South Easton, Massachusetts, peacefully passed away on August 7, 2020. She was the beloved wife of Gerald for 60 years, devoted mother of Jason Cohn and Jennifer Blanchard, proud Grandmother of Gregory and Andrew Blanchard and dear sister of Leslie Brodsky. Jessica also leaves behind many loving nieces’ nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews.

Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1939, Jessica received her Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Akron. She served as the Director of Early Childhood Education for more than 20 years at The Akron Jewish Center. Jessica was a creative soul and talented artist who loved making and baking. From needlepoint to quilting to gourmet meals everything was made with much thought and care. She also had a deep love of all sports especially her beloved Boston teams, The Celtics, Patriots and Bruins.

 

Due to the Pandemic, the services are private.

Burial will be on Monday, August 10 at The Massachusetts National Cemetery in Bourne, Massachusetts.

A celebration of life will take place post-Pandemic.

Donations may be made in Jessica’s honor to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research


Phyllis Sonja Solomon

Phyllis Sonja Solomon, daughter of the late Betty and Harry Cohen of Brockton passed away in Newton on Saturday at age 96 of heart disease.

Phyllis retired one year ago after 38 years of Public Service as a Nurse Manager in the Massachusetts PACE program where she reviewed and managed over 5000 lives during her career. Upon her retirement her important contribution to the program was memorialized with the creation of the Phyllis Solomon Award for those who strived to follow her model. She was a graduate of the Cambridge City Hospital Nursing School after graduating from Brockton High School and later pursued her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at the University of Massachusetts and Boston College School of Nursing at age 52. She worked tirelessly to improve care for the elderly, the disabled and those suffering from head injuries. In a personal letter on her retirement last year Governor Baker praised her energy, her willingness to approach patient care with an open mind and her long and dedicated commitment to public service. Countless health care workers from Atlanta to Boston benefited from her mentoring.

Phyllis and her husband helped to found and support the Solomon House at the Paul A Dever School in Taunton which is now celebrating its 75th year. In keeping with Phyllis’s interest in advocating for the disabled and impaired, she was an active Board Member of the former MARC Trust for many years. She taught her family the importance of caring, giving and hard work which she embodied in her tireless pursuit of excellence.

Phyllis is pre-deceased by her husband of 50 years, Albert and is survived by her children David and Melissa Solomon, Martin and Betsy Solomon, Robert Solomon, Richard and the late Susan Solomon, Sharon and Paul Kaliner and Sue-Ann Solomon as well as 15 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren all of whom were blessed to have known her love and benefited from her boundless energy and guidance. She leaves her brother Morton Cohen and Bobbie, Rhoda Cohen and her late brother Jerome and countless nieces and nephews. She also leaves her dear friend Marie Croisetu and her lifelong friend since age 3 Ida Tatelbaum of Dartmouth.

Graveside Services will be private on Monday, August 10.

Shiva will be via Zoom through Temple Emanuel in Newton Monday evening before sunset.
In lieu of flowers Phyllis requested that donations be made to support the nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital by way of the “BWH Patient Services Fund.” Memorial gifts can be made online at

bwhgiving.org/solomon or sent to BWH Development Office, 116 Huntington Ave. 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02116


Diane M. Israel

Israel, Diane M., age 73, of Needham, on August 5, 2020.  Beloved wife of the late Alvin J. Israel, with whom she shared almost 49 years of blessed marriage.  Devoted mother of Jason Israel and his wife Marni of Holliston and Michelle Bistany and her husband Erik of North Reading.  Cherished and adored Mimi of Max, Sophie, and Sam Israel and Goldie Bistany.  Loving sister of Audrey Stengel. Sister-in-law and special friend to Bernice Rieders Sickle.

Diane grew up in Swampscott, MA where she developed a love for the beach.  After high school, she went on to get an Associates Degree and had a career in downtown Boston working as a legal secretary.  The love of her life was her family.  She enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, reading a good book, playing Mah Jong, baking and sharing a delicious meal with family. She loved to show her grandchildren how to bake.  There was nothing better than spending a day with Mimi.  Her smile was contagious, and she made friends wherever she went.  Her positive energy always filled the room with smiles. She fought a courageous battle with cancer and she kept a positive attitude until the very end.  She will be forever missed.

Due to the pandemic and social distancing restrictions, services are private.  In lieu of flowers, donations in Diane’s memory may be made to http://danafarber.jimmyfund.org/goto/JacobSands.


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